2014: Oral History Intensive, June 13-20, 2014 

Oral History Intensive
Instructor: Suzanne Snider
June 13-20, 2014
Fee: $860

FULL FOR 2014: WE ARE NO LONGER ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR THE ORAL HISTORY INTENSIVE. WE DO HAVE SPOTS IN THE RADIO WORKSHOP AND PROJECT LAB.

Come all ye budding oral historians, radio documentarians, writers, filmmakers, media advocates, and photographers who wish to make of use of oral history in your practices. This immersive summer workshop is a rigorous introduction to the field of Oral History. Over the course of eight days, we will cover interview techniques, project design, recording tutorials, and ethics, along with special topics related to the field. This is a great opportunity to jump-start a project in a supportive environment, or to get this training under your belt for future projects with the benefit of deadlines and critique. Participants will be conducting interviews throughout the week. No experience necessary.

BACK

2014: Oral History & Radio, June 21-25 

Oral History & Radio

Instructor: Michael Garofalo
June 21-25, 2014
Class size: 12
Fee: $675 
Sponsored by Hindenburg Systems

For those interested in bringing your oral histories to the airwaves, this five-day intensive workshop covers the fundamentals of radio storytelling, focusing primarily on the editing process that occurs after you have collected your interviews. Students will learn how to conceptualize and develop a story for radio, as well as how to edit and assemble interview tape and incorporate additional sound, such as music, to really make a story sing. We will listen to a range of storytelling styles and find the right form for the story you want to tell.

The workshop will include one-on-one editorial sessions as well as group listening and feedback sessions. Depending on experience and facility with editing software, some students may expect to finish their radio piece by the end of the workshop. All students, however, will leave the workshop with the skills and editorial direction to finish their piece independently. Note: Experience with audio or video editing software is required. We will be providing some instruction on software, but students enrolling in this workshop should possess a high degree of competence and comfort with computers. Students will have the chance to share their documentaries-in-progress on radio station WGXC.

This workshop is appropriate for would-be radio producers, podcasters, bloggers, filmmakers, audiophiles, and writers, among others.

Equipment: Laptop and headphones required. Hindenburg Systems has generously donated a three-month trial of Hindenburg editing software to all participants, along with a discount for those who purchase Hindenburg software after the workshop.

Note: Enrollment preference will be given to alums of the Oral History Intensive (2012, 2013, 2014) and then filled as space allows. Returning students are welcome with permission of instructor.

BACK

2014: Oral History Experiments: Project Lab, June 27-July 1

Oral History Experiments: Project Lab
Instructor: Suzanne Snider
Guest Artists: Sarah Kramer (The New York Times, NPR, PBS and HBO) and Jennifer Karady (Soldiers’ Stories from Iraq and Afghanistan)
June 27-July 1, 2014
$475

This cross-disciplinary workshop will be useful for those at all stages of oral history-related projects who wish to work in dialogue with other makers. Students should come to this workshop with a sketch, dream or project-in-motion, which may be experimental or traditional in form. Examples of projects include: sound installation, radio documentary, public health studies, community archives, longform journalism, and more.

Designed as a focused brainstorming and problem-solving workshop, our days will be divided between daily check-ins, individual consultation with the instructor, and sessions with guest artists, leaving some time to work independently or explore Hudson’s swimming spots and fruit orchards. Documentarians, writers, artists, academics and others are all welcome. Experience with oral history methodology is assumed.

Please note: This workshop requires eight participants to run. Priority will be given to OHSS alums, but others with Oral History experience may contact the instructor.

BACK

2014 Instructors and Staff



Suzanne Snider (Founder, Director, Instructor, Oral History Intensive)  is a writer and oral historian. She has worked as an interviewer or consultant for Columbia University’s Center for Oral History, MoMA, Center for Reproductive Rights, the New York Academy of Medicine, HBO Productions, the Newtown Creek Community Health and Harms Narrative Project, the Brooklyn Arts Council, and the Prison Public Memory Project, among others. Her own oral history projects have addressed disappearing labor forces, rehabilitative medicine, parapsychology, and feminist presses. She serves on the Judd Foundation’s Oral History Advisory Board and chairs the Stetson Kennedy Vox Populi Award Committee. Her work––published in The Washington Post, The Guardian, Legal Affairs, Guernica, The Believer, and several artist books––has been supported through fellowships from the MacDowell Colony, Yaddo, the Sloan Foundation, the UCross Foundation Center, and the Radcliffe Institute. She received a 2011 commission from Triple Canopy for New Media Reporting. She teaches at the New School University and is currently completing a book about a divided commune in Middle America.



Michael Garofalo (Instructor, Oral History and Radio) is senior producer for the national oral history project StoryCorps. A member of the two-time Peabody Award-winning production team (2006 & 2011), Michael has had a hand in creating nearly all of the project’s content — from producing StoryCorps’ weekly national broadcasts on NPR’s Morning Edition and hosting the podcast, to contributing to the first StoryCorps book, to co-producing a series of Emmy-nominated animated shorts for PBS’s POV. He has trained producers in both the US and in the UK for BBC Radio 4. In 2010, Michael launched a podcast for the respected online film journal, Reverse Shot. Michael also makes music using radios — among other things — and is a Transmission Artist with the nonprofit arts organization free103point9. In 2012, Michael was a finalist for the Livingston Award for Young Journalists.



Jennifer Karady (Guest Instructor, Project Lab) is an artist/photographer who works with real people to dramatize their stories through narrative, metaphorical, and allegorical techniques. Recently, Karady has been working with American veterans of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan to create staged narrative photographs that both depict their individual stories and address their difficulties in adjusting to civilian life. In Country: Soldiers’ Stories from Iraq and Afghanistan has been exhibited at SF Camerawork in San Francisco, the Myhren Gallery, University of Denver, CEPA Gallery in Buffalo, The Berman Museum at Ursinus College and continues to travel the country; the project has been featured in The New York Times, on National Public Radio and reviewed in Frieze. Her work is in the permanent collections of San Francisco Museum of Modern Art and the Albright Knox Gallery. She made two photographs with veterans while at Yaddo during the summers of 2008 and 2009.



Sarah Kramer (Guest Instructor, Project Lab) is a documentary storyteller and journalist. She was recently a fellow at Sundance New Frontiers Storytelling Lab and currently heads up content at a soon-to-launch storytelling start-up. Prior, Kramer worked at The New York Times for six years where she was a reporter and multimedia editor, creating series such as Emmy-award winning One in 8 Million and Emmy nominated Coming Out. Her credits also include senior producer and founding staffer for Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps where she created the signature sound, provided editorial oversight on the weekly NPR broadcasts and the New York Times bestseller, Listening is an Act of Love.

Her radio stories have aired on All Things Considered, Morning Edition and Marketplace; her writing in The New York Times and digital storytelling on NYTimes.com. She launched her career in documentary films for PBS and HBO and is completing a documentary short on her father. Kramer is an adjunct professor at CUNY Journalism School where she teaches the Art of the Interview. You can follow her @sarahk11.



Eugenie Mukeshimana (Guest Instructor, Oral History Intensive) is the Founder and Executive Director of Genocide Survivors Support Network (GSSN), a NJ-based nonprofit organization that serves immigrant genocide survivors in America. As one of the leading voices among survivors of the 1994 genocide in Rwanda, she frequently presents on genocide and war topics and travels around the country to speak about her experiences during the genocide. In an effort to gain a better understanding of current and future challenges of living with the memories of the genocide, Eugenie began to conduct filmed interviews with Holocaust survivors about their post-holocaust experiences.

Eugenie helps survivors to open up and tell their stories often for the first time and sometimes before total strangers. She also helps them manage the post-disclosure range of emotions. Her work with refugees as a freelance telephonic language and cultural interpreter for leading language service companies helped her uncover serious communication challenges faced by refugees and service providers across the country and has contributed a chapter in Children and Families Affected by Armed Conflicts in Africa: Implications and Strategies for Helping Professionals in the United States. NASW Press 2012.

Eugenie holds a Bachelor’s in Social Work from the College of St. Rose in Albany, NY. She was a 2012 Human Rights Advocate Program fellow at Columbia University. She is a mother of one daughter born during the genocide and lives in South Orange, NJ.


Todd Shalom (Guest Instructor,Project Lab) works with text, sound and image to re-contextualize the body in space using vocabulary of the everyday. He is the founder and director of Elastic City. In this role, Todd leads his own walks, collaborates with artists to lead joint walks, and works with artists in a variety of disciplines to adapt their expertise to the participatory walk format. He often collaborates with performance artist/director Niegel Smith. Together, they conceive and stage interactive performances in public and private environments. Todd is also a ringleader of Willing Participant. Willing Participant whips up urgent poetic responses to crazy shit that happens.

Todd’s work has been presented by organizations such as Abrons Art Center, Creative Time, ISSUE Project Room, The Kitchen, The Museum of Modern Art, The New Museum, P.S. 122 and Printed Matter. He is a graduate of the MFA Writing Program at California College of the Arts and also holds a B.S. in Business Administration from Boston University. Todd is a member of the core faculty in Pratt Institute’s new MFA in Writing program.


Lauren Kelly (OHSS Assistant) is a filmmaker and a dancer, who began making her first dance film this year called DANCEFLOORED. It explores the particular ways in which childhood memory differs from that of adults. She received a Masters in Media Studies from The New School in 2014. Her first short documentary, ECHO about a crumbling bell tower at a church in Harlem has been featured in festivals around NYC, premiering at Sunshine Cinema as a part of NY Shorts 2012. The piece she worked on during last years Radio and Oral History workshop is currently exhibited at the Sheila Johnson Design Center. She is a freelance shooter and editor of video and sound, and is working on developing three film projects all of which incorporate oral history practices. Her work can be seen at www.laurenelizabethkelly.com.

Oral History Summer School

This immersive summer school serves as a rigorous introduction to the field of Oral History, in the beautiful Hudson Valley.

Oral History Summer School was established in Hudson, New York in 2012 to train an international group of writers, social workers, radio producers, artists, teachers, human rights workers, and undecided’s to make use of Oral History in their documentary and artistic practices.

Beginning in 2013, additional, specialized workshops will be offered for the continuing oral historian or those interested in advanced issues in the field.

Founder/Director: Suzanne Snider

Visiting Instructors (Past/Present)
Laura Checkoway (Filmmaker/Journalist)
Eugenie Mukeshimana (Genocide Survivors Support Network)
Michael Garofalo (Storycorps)
Michael Premo (Housing is a Human Right, Sandy Storyline)
Rachel Falcone (Housing is a Human Right, Sandy Storyline)
Sady Sullivan (Brooklyn Historical Society)
Sara Kendall (Kite’s Nest, WGXC)
Sarah Kramer (New York Times)

BACK

Find us on Facebook!: https://www.facebook.com/OralHistorySummerSchool

2013 WORKSHOP: Building an Oral History Archive, June 11 & 12, 2013

Instructor: Sady Sullivan
June 11 & 12
Class size: 20
Fee: $240

Long-term preservation plans are an integral part of collecting oral histories. Even if you have plans for present-day use, people 100 years from now want to hear your interviews. In this two-day workshop, Sady Sullivan will guide us in the art and science of building an oral history archive. She will discuss best practices––storage, processing, stabilization, the importance of metadata––as well as how (and when) to make inquiries at existing repositories where we hope to house our projects. We will also go over available (open source and affordable) digital tools. Stepping back from the conventions of the field, we will explore what kinds of alternative archival models exist or might we invent.

We will have the chance to apply what we learn by working with the OHSS collection and your own interviews, walking though archival challenges and outlining key policies for the OHSS archive, such as how visitors will browse, search, and listen to the collections. Who should have access to the archive? Is the library the best place for it? What kind of guidelines will be given to journalists to ensure our narrators’ stories are not manipulated or misconstrued? By the end of the workshop, you’ll be able to show off your archive-literacy, using words like LOCKSS and Drupal.

This workshop is appropriate for teachers, activists, family historians, artists, would-be archivists and others who wish to preserve their interviews.

Note: For short courses, enrollment preference will be given to alums of the Oral History Intensive (2012, 2013) and then filled as space allows.

2013 WORKSHOP: Oral History and the Documentary Film, June 12, 2013

Instructor: Laura Checkoway
June 12
Class size: 15
Fee: $225

In this one-day intensive, filmmaker Laura Checkoway will discuss how she makes use of oral history in her documentary work.  We’ll discuss camera angles, equipment choices, setup, ethical issues, release forms, and the strengths/limitations of video as a medium. What kinds of compromises are necessary when it comes to editing “footage” (interviews) that we have come to appreciate, uncut? How does the camera’s presence and position affect an oral history—for the interviewer, interviewee and for the audience? This workshop combines conversation and demonstrations with hands-on exercises. Students will have the chance to apply the concepts discussed by filming an oral history during the course of the day. No camera experience necessary.

This workshop is appropriate for aspiring filmmakers, archivists, community historians, exhibit designers, public historians, artists, family historians, and bloggers, among others.


Note: For short courses, enrollment preference will be given to alums of the Oral History Intensive (2012, 2013) and then filled as space allows.

2013 WORKSHOP: Interviewing Survivors of Complex Trauma, June 13, 2013

Instructor: Eugenie Mukeshimana
Class size: 20
Fee: $225

Participants will explore the complex nature of trauma and how it affects the shape and experience of survivors’ narratives. How might such narratives serve as testimony, documentation, persuasive media, intervention, or as an opportunity for the narrator to integrate an experience of trauma into his/her larger life history?

Eugenie Mukeshimana, founder of the Genocide Survivors Support Network, will use role-playing exercises to help interviewers understand the survivors’ perspective during interview sessions. Workshop participants will learn specific techniques to help the narrator tell his/her story throughout the interview. We will also develop tools to establish rapport, to emotionally support the narrator when needed, to control our own emotions during the interview session when faced with stories of cumulative and collective trauma, and to help the narrator deal with the post-interview emotions.

Although the course deals with a challenging topic, participants can expect to have fun throughout the day, with interactive role-playing games and group work. There will be time for reflection on the day’s exercises and conversations, as well as related readings.

The day-long workshop will conclude with an evening public talk by Eugenie, when she will discuss stories that go unreported by journalists but hold significance to survivors, as well as how survivors talk about genocide among themselves.

Questions

Please contact us at oralhistorysummerschool [at] gmail.com for more information

The Archive

The Oral History Summer School Oral History Archive (pronounced OH-SO-HA) aims to preserve the widest possible range of experiences in the Hudson area, to document the communities’ complex history in the words and voices of its participants. The archive is comprised of oral histories conducted by Oral History Summer School students in conversation with residents from Hudson and the surrounding communities, with an emphasis on “everyday life” experiences, past and present. So far, the collection gives voice to subjects including: architecture, industrial history, farming, gentrification, racial tension, civic spaces and institutions (the prison, library, and schools), churches, social clubs, and small businesses. With this archive, we hope to promote and encourage dialogue, in the collaborative process of interviewing and in the process of sharing the interviews with listeners. We view the interviews as opportunities for residents to reflect on their lives and experiences. We are working on processing 103 interviews, currently, to open the archive publicly during OHSS 2015.


About Oral History Summer School: Oral History Summer School is an annual set of workshops that includes local residents as well as visiting students from other states and countries.  Oral History Summer School was established in Hudson, New York in 2012 to train writers, social workers, radio producers, artists, teachers, human rights workers, and others to make use of Oral History in their documentary and artistic practices. These interviews that comprise the archive serve as opportunities to both train students and to give back to the community. Interviews are conducted in accordance with the Oral History Association’s best practices and standards.

About Oral History: Oral History is an interview practice that differs from traditional journalistic interviews in several ways. Oral history interviews are comprised of open-ended questions and allow the interviewee to guide the interview’s trajectory. You may hear lots of silence between questions and answers, which is also an important characteristic of oral history practice. The field views interviews as  collaborations and the shared property of both interviewer and interviewee. All interviewees receive copies of their interviews. While oral history can be used to talk about the past, it also offers a meaningful framework to discuss the present and the future.

2014: Oral History Intensive, June 13-20, 2014 

Oral History Intensive
Instructor: Suzanne Snider
June 13-20, 2014
Fee: $860

FULL FOR 2014: WE ARE NO LONGER ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR THE ORAL HISTORY INTENSIVE. WE DO HAVE SPOTS IN THE RADIO WORKSHOP AND PROJECT LAB.

Come all ye budding oral historians, radio documentarians, writers, filmmakers, media advocates, and photographers who wish to make of use of oral history in your practices. This immersive summer workshop is a rigorous introduction to the field of Oral History. Over the course of eight days, we will cover interview techniques, project design, recording tutorials, and ethics, along with special topics related to the field. This is a great opportunity to jump-start a project in a supportive environment, or to get this training under your belt for future projects with the benefit of deadlines and critique. Participants will be conducting interviews throughout the week. No experience necessary.

BACK

2014: Oral History & Radio, June 21-25 

Oral History & Radio

Instructor: Michael Garofalo
June 21-25, 2014
Class size: 12
Fee: $675 
Sponsored by Hindenburg Systems

For those interested in bringing your oral histories to the airwaves, this five-day intensive workshop covers the fundamentals of radio storytelling, focusing primarily on the editing process that occurs after you have collected your interviews. Students will learn how to conceptualize and develop a story for radio, as well as how to edit and assemble interview tape and incorporate additional sound, such as music, to really make a story sing. We will listen to a range of storytelling styles and find the right form for the story you want to tell.

The workshop will include one-on-one editorial sessions as well as group listening and feedback sessions. Depending on experience and facility with editing software, some students may expect to finish their radio piece by the end of the workshop. All students, however, will leave the workshop with the skills and editorial direction to finish their piece independently. Note: Experience with audio or video editing software is required. We will be providing some instruction on software, but students enrolling in this workshop should possess a high degree of competence and comfort with computers. Students will have the chance to share their documentaries-in-progress on radio station WGXC.

This workshop is appropriate for would-be radio producers, podcasters, bloggers, filmmakers, audiophiles, and writers, among others.

Equipment: Laptop and headphones required. Hindenburg Systems has generously donated a three-month trial of Hindenburg editing software to all participants, along with a discount for those who purchase Hindenburg software after the workshop.

Note: Enrollment preference will be given to alums of the Oral History Intensive (2012, 2013, 2014) and then filled as space allows. Returning students are welcome with permission of instructor.

BACK

2014: Oral History Experiments: Project Lab, June 27-July 1

Oral History Experiments: Project Lab
Instructor: Suzanne Snider
Guest Artists: Sarah Kramer (The New York Times, NPR, PBS and HBO) and Jennifer Karady (Soldiers’ Stories from Iraq and Afghanistan)
June 27-July 1, 2014
$475

This cross-disciplinary workshop will be useful for those at all stages of oral history-related projects who wish to work in dialogue with other makers. Students should come to this workshop with a sketch, dream or project-in-motion, which may be experimental or traditional in form. Examples of projects include: sound installation, radio documentary, public health studies, community archives, longform journalism, and more.

Designed as a focused brainstorming and problem-solving workshop, our days will be divided between daily check-ins, individual consultation with the instructor, and sessions with guest artists, leaving some time to work independently or explore Hudson’s swimming spots and fruit orchards. Documentarians, writers, artists, academics and others are all welcome. Experience with oral history methodology is assumed.

Please note: This workshop requires eight participants to run. Priority will be given to OHSS alums, but others with Oral History experience may contact the instructor.

BACK

2014 Instructors and Staff



Suzanne Snider (Founder, Director, Instructor, Oral History Intensive)  is a writer and oral historian. She has worked as an interviewer or consultant for Columbia University’s Center for Oral History, MoMA, Center for Reproductive Rights, the New York Academy of Medicine, HBO Productions, the Newtown Creek Community Health and Harms Narrative Project, the Brooklyn Arts Council, and the Prison Public Memory Project, among others. Her own oral history projects have addressed disappearing labor forces, rehabilitative medicine, parapsychology, and feminist presses. She serves on the Judd Foundation’s Oral History Advisory Board and chairs the Stetson Kennedy Vox Populi Award Committee. Her work––published in The Washington Post, The Guardian, Legal Affairs, Guernica, The Believer, and several artist books––has been supported through fellowships from the MacDowell Colony, Yaddo, the Sloan Foundation, the UCross Foundation Center, and the Radcliffe Institute. She received a 2011 commission from Triple Canopy for New Media Reporting. She teaches at the New School University and is currently completing a book about a divided commune in Middle America.



Michael Garofalo (Instructor, Oral History and Radio) is senior producer for the national oral history project StoryCorps. A member of the two-time Peabody Award-winning production team (2006 & 2011), Michael has had a hand in creating nearly all of the project’s content — from producing StoryCorps’ weekly national broadcasts on NPR’s Morning Edition and hosting the podcast, to contributing to the first StoryCorps book, to co-producing a series of Emmy-nominated animated shorts for PBS’s POV. He has trained producers in both the US and in the UK for BBC Radio 4. In 2010, Michael launched a podcast for the respected online film journal, Reverse Shot. Michael also makes music using radios — among other things — and is a Transmission Artist with the nonprofit arts organization free103point9. In 2012, Michael was a finalist for the Livingston Award for Young Journalists.



Jennifer Karady (Guest Instructor, Project Lab) is an artist/photographer who works with real people to dramatize their stories through narrative, metaphorical, and allegorical techniques. Recently, Karady has been working with American veterans of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan to create staged narrative photographs that both depict their individual stories and address their difficulties in adjusting to civilian life. In Country: Soldiers’ Stories from Iraq and Afghanistan has been exhibited at SF Camerawork in San Francisco, the Myhren Gallery, University of Denver, CEPA Gallery in Buffalo, The Berman Museum at Ursinus College and continues to travel the country; the project has been featured in The New York Times, on National Public Radio and reviewed in Frieze. Her work is in the permanent collections of San Francisco Museum of Modern Art and the Albright Knox Gallery. She made two photographs with veterans while at Yaddo during the summers of 2008 and 2009.



Sarah Kramer (Guest Instructor, Project Lab) is a documentary storyteller and journalist. She was recently a fellow at Sundance New Frontiers Storytelling Lab and currently heads up content at a soon-to-launch storytelling start-up. Prior, Kramer worked at The New York Times for six years where she was a reporter and multimedia editor, creating series such as Emmy-award winning One in 8 Million and Emmy nominated Coming Out. Her credits also include senior producer and founding staffer for Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps where she created the signature sound, provided editorial oversight on the weekly NPR broadcasts and the New York Times bestseller, Listening is an Act of Love.

Her radio stories have aired on All Things Considered, Morning Edition and Marketplace; her writing in The New York Times and digital storytelling on NYTimes.com. She launched her career in documentary films for PBS and HBO and is completing a documentary short on her father. Kramer is an adjunct professor at CUNY Journalism School where she teaches the Art of the Interview. You can follow her @sarahk11.



Eugenie Mukeshimana (Guest Instructor, Oral History Intensive) is the Founder and Executive Director of Genocide Survivors Support Network (GSSN), a NJ-based nonprofit organization that serves immigrant genocide survivors in America. As one of the leading voices among survivors of the 1994 genocide in Rwanda, she frequently presents on genocide and war topics and travels around the country to speak about her experiences during the genocide. In an effort to gain a better understanding of current and future challenges of living with the memories of the genocide, Eugenie began to conduct filmed interviews with Holocaust survivors about their post-holocaust experiences.

Eugenie helps survivors to open up and tell their stories often for the first time and sometimes before total strangers. She also helps them manage the post-disclosure range of emotions. Her work with refugees as a freelance telephonic language and cultural interpreter for leading language service companies helped her uncover serious communication challenges faced by refugees and service providers across the country and has contributed a chapter in Children and Families Affected by Armed Conflicts in Africa: Implications and Strategies for Helping Professionals in the United States. NASW Press 2012.

Eugenie holds a Bachelor’s in Social Work from the College of St. Rose in Albany, NY. She was a 2012 Human Rights Advocate Program fellow at Columbia University. She is a mother of one daughter born during the genocide and lives in South Orange, NJ.


Todd Shalom (Guest Instructor,Project Lab) works with text, sound and image to re-contextualize the body in space using vocabulary of the everyday. He is the founder and director of Elastic City. In this role, Todd leads his own walks, collaborates with artists to lead joint walks, and works with artists in a variety of disciplines to adapt their expertise to the participatory walk format. He often collaborates with performance artist/director Niegel Smith. Together, they conceive and stage interactive performances in public and private environments. Todd is also a ringleader of Willing Participant. Willing Participant whips up urgent poetic responses to crazy shit that happens.

Todd’s work has been presented by organizations such as Abrons Art Center, Creative Time, ISSUE Project Room, The Kitchen, The Museum of Modern Art, The New Museum, P.S. 122 and Printed Matter. He is a graduate of the MFA Writing Program at California College of the Arts and also holds a B.S. in Business Administration from Boston University. Todd is a member of the core faculty in Pratt Institute’s new MFA in Writing program.


Lauren Kelly (OHSS Assistant) is a filmmaker and a dancer, who began making her first dance film this year called DANCEFLOORED. It explores the particular ways in which childhood memory differs from that of adults. She received a Masters in Media Studies from The New School in 2014. Her first short documentary, ECHO about a crumbling bell tower at a church in Harlem has been featured in festivals around NYC, premiering at Sunshine Cinema as a part of NY Shorts 2012. The piece she worked on during last years Radio and Oral History workshop is currently exhibited at the Sheila Johnson Design Center. She is a freelance shooter and editor of video and sound, and is working on developing three film projects all of which incorporate oral history practices. Her work can be seen at www.laurenelizabethkelly.com.

Oral History Summer School

This immersive summer school serves as a rigorous introduction to the field of Oral History, in the beautiful Hudson Valley.

Oral History Summer School was established in Hudson, New York in 2012 to train an international group of writers, social workers, radio producers, artists, teachers, human rights workers, and undecided’s to make use of Oral History in their documentary and artistic practices.

Beginning in 2013, additional, specialized workshops will be offered for the continuing oral historian or those interested in advanced issues in the field.

Founder/Director: Suzanne Snider

Visiting Instructors (Past/Present)
Laura Checkoway (Filmmaker/Journalist)
Eugenie Mukeshimana (Genocide Survivors Support Network)
Michael Garofalo (Storycorps)
Michael Premo (Housing is a Human Right, Sandy Storyline)
Rachel Falcone (Housing is a Human Right, Sandy Storyline)
Sady Sullivan (Brooklyn Historical Society)
Sara Kendall (Kite’s Nest, WGXC)
Sarah Kramer (New York Times)

BACK

Find us on Facebook!: https://www.facebook.com/OralHistorySummerSchool

2013 WORKSHOP: Building an Oral History Archive, June 11 & 12, 2013

Instructor: Sady Sullivan
June 11 & 12
Class size: 20
Fee: $240

Long-term preservation plans are an integral part of collecting oral histories. Even if you have plans for present-day use, people 100 years from now want to hear your interviews. In this two-day workshop, Sady Sullivan will guide us in the art and science of building an oral history archive. She will discuss best practices––storage, processing, stabilization, the importance of metadata––as well as how (and when) to make inquiries at existing repositories where we hope to house our projects. We will also go over available (open source and affordable) digital tools. Stepping back from the conventions of the field, we will explore what kinds of alternative archival models exist or might we invent.

We will have the chance to apply what we learn by working with the OHSS collection and your own interviews, walking though archival challenges and outlining key policies for the OHSS archive, such as how visitors will browse, search, and listen to the collections. Who should have access to the archive? Is the library the best place for it? What kind of guidelines will be given to journalists to ensure our narrators’ stories are not manipulated or misconstrued? By the end of the workshop, you’ll be able to show off your archive-literacy, using words like LOCKSS and Drupal.

This workshop is appropriate for teachers, activists, family historians, artists, would-be archivists and others who wish to preserve their interviews.

Note: For short courses, enrollment preference will be given to alums of the Oral History Intensive (2012, 2013) and then filled as space allows.

2013 WORKSHOP: Oral History and the Documentary Film, June 12, 2013

Instructor: Laura Checkoway
June 12
Class size: 15
Fee: $225

In this one-day intensive, filmmaker Laura Checkoway will discuss how she makes use of oral history in her documentary work.  We’ll discuss camera angles, equipment choices, setup, ethical issues, release forms, and the strengths/limitations of video as a medium. What kinds of compromises are necessary when it comes to editing “footage” (interviews) that we have come to appreciate, uncut? How does the camera’s presence and position affect an oral history—for the interviewer, interviewee and for the audience? This workshop combines conversation and demonstrations with hands-on exercises. Students will have the chance to apply the concepts discussed by filming an oral history during the course of the day. No camera experience necessary.

This workshop is appropriate for aspiring filmmakers, archivists, community historians, exhibit designers, public historians, artists, family historians, and bloggers, among others.


Note: For short courses, enrollment preference will be given to alums of the Oral History Intensive (2012, 2013) and then filled as space allows.

2013 WORKSHOP: Interviewing Survivors of Complex Trauma, June 13, 2013

Instructor: Eugenie Mukeshimana
Class size: 20
Fee: $225

Participants will explore the complex nature of trauma and how it affects the shape and experience of survivors’ narratives. How might such narratives serve as testimony, documentation, persuasive media, intervention, or as an opportunity for the narrator to integrate an experience of trauma into his/her larger life history?

Eugenie Mukeshimana, founder of the Genocide Survivors Support Network, will use role-playing exercises to help interviewers understand the survivors’ perspective during interview sessions. Workshop participants will learn specific techniques to help the narrator tell his/her story throughout the interview. We will also develop tools to establish rapport, to emotionally support the narrator when needed, to control our own emotions during the interview session when faced with stories of cumulative and collective trauma, and to help the narrator deal with the post-interview emotions.

Although the course deals with a challenging topic, participants can expect to have fun throughout the day, with interactive role-playing games and group work. There will be time for reflection on the day’s exercises and conversations, as well as related readings.

The day-long workshop will conclude with an evening public talk by Eugenie, when she will discuss stories that go unreported by journalists but hold significance to survivors, as well as how survivors talk about genocide among themselves.

Questions

Please contact us at oralhistorysummerschool [at] gmail.com for more information

The Archive

The Oral History Summer School Oral History Archive (pronounced OH-SO-HA) aims to preserve the widest possible range of experiences in the Hudson area, to document the communities’ complex history in the words and voices of its participants. The archive is comprised of oral histories conducted by Oral History Summer School students in conversation with residents from Hudson and the surrounding communities, with an emphasis on “everyday life” experiences, past and present. So far, the collection gives voice to subjects including: architecture, industrial history, farming, gentrification, racial tension, civic spaces and institutions (the prison, library, and schools), churches, social clubs, and small businesses. With this archive, we hope to promote and encourage dialogue, in the collaborative process of interviewing and in the process of sharing the interviews with listeners. We view the interviews as opportunities for residents to reflect on their lives and experiences. We are working on processing 103 interviews, currently, to open the archive publicly during OHSS 2015.


About Oral History Summer School: Oral History Summer School is an annual set of workshops that includes local residents as well as visiting students from other states and countries.  Oral History Summer School was established in Hudson, New York in 2012 to train writers, social workers, radio producers, artists, teachers, human rights workers, and others to make use of Oral History in their documentary and artistic practices. These interviews that comprise the archive serve as opportunities to both train students and to give back to the community. Interviews are conducted in accordance with the Oral History Association’s best practices and standards.

About Oral History: Oral History is an interview practice that differs from traditional journalistic interviews in several ways. Oral history interviews are comprised of open-ended questions and allow the interviewee to guide the interview’s trajectory. You may hear lots of silence between questions and answers, which is also an important characteristic of oral history practice. The field views interviews as  collaborations and the shared property of both interviewer and interviewee. All interviewees receive copies of their interviews. While oral history can be used to talk about the past, it also offers a meaningful framework to discuss the present and the future.

2014: Oral History Intensive, June 13-20, 2014 
2014: Oral History & Radio, June 21-25 
2014: Oral History Experiments: Project Lab, June 27-July 1
2014 Instructors and Staff
Oral History Summer School
Questions

About:

Oral History Summer School

This immersive summer workshop is a rigorous introduction to the field of Oral History, in the beautiful Hudson Valley.

Oral History Summer School was established in Hudson, New York in 2012 to train an international group of writers, social workers, radio producers, artists, teachers, human rights workers, and undecided’s to make use of Oral History in their documentary and artistic practices.

Beginning in 2013, additional, specialized workshops will be offered for the continuing oral historian or those interested in advanced issues in the field.

Founder/Director: Suzanne Snider

Visiting Instructors (Past/Present)
Laura Checkoway (Filmmaker/Journalist)
Eugenie Mukeshimana (Genocide Survivors Support Network)
Michael Garofalo (Storycorps)
Michael Premo and Rachel Falcone (Housing is a Human Right)
Sara Kendall (Kite’s Nest, WGXC)
Sarah Kramer (New York Times)
Sady Sullivan (Brooklyn Historical Society)